The Best Apps For Student Physiologists

(in my opinion and predominantly found on android)

EDIT: I have added a 5th app at the bottom of the page, “Read by QxMD”.

My bus journey to university can take anywhere from 1.5 to 2.25 hours, depending on how willing the driver is to break the speed limit, so I try my best to make good use of the time available.
It can be rather cumbersome to hold a textbook when the bus is full and the constant movement makes it rather difficult to follow the words on a page, so I downloaded a few apps to help pass the time as well as study and, as you can imagine, some of them have been better than others.
So that you don’t have to spend your wages/student loan unnecessarily, I’ve decided to share those few apps that have either interested me, or helped me during the PTP programme so far.

I’ve omitted any apps that are effectively digital print textbooks, as these are often promoted in both Google Play and the App Store, costing £20-30 and are nowhere near as difficult to find as a couple of these picks.
I’m also not suggesting that you get all of these apps, either; were it not for this post, I wouldn’t have them all. Everyone learns differently, so you’ll probably need one or two at most.

All of these prices are correct at the time of posting, but if any have changed, let me know and I’ll update them accordingly.

 

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1.) ECGsource, Cathsource, Echosource (ECGsource LLC)
 Google Play: £1.92, £2.54, £3.03
App Store:      £0.79, £2.29, £2.29

These three apps provide a great deal of content and are very reasonably priced, but ECGsource on it’s own is the app that will benefit Y1&2 PTP students the most. It contains information and analysis parameters for a very large number of pathologies, videos to help you understand key principles in ECG science and a tutorial on reading a normal ECG.
This app is a personal favourite of mine, not just for the number of arrhythmias it covers, but for the examples it gives in addition to these.
If you have an android device and you can only get one app, make it this one.

Screenshot_2015-10-05-21-09-05~22.) ECG Practical Demo (One 2 One Medicine LTD)
Google Play: Free
App Store:     N/A

This app isn’t nearly as easy to follow as ECGsource, but is still packed with content once you know what you’re doing. It also contains a rate/R-R correction tool, a set of digital calipers and an easy to use axis calculator for measurements on the go.
There is a paid version of this app available to purchase, but if you spend a couple of quid, you’ll get all the same information with better quality examples by getting ECGsource or QxMD. For the tools you get with the free version, however, you can check your answers on analysis assignments for free, making this worth a look.

I’m yet to find an app with all of these features on the App Store, but, if I’m honest, I started running out of money whilst wading through the plethora of terrible apps out there, so stopped looking.

Screenshot_2015-10-05-17-24-33~23.) 100 ECG Cases for Finals (One 2 One Medicine LTD)
Google Play: Free
App Store:     N/A

A quiz featuring (shockingly) 100 ECG Cases for you to analyse and be graded on.
Quizzes are grouped into categories such as Uncommon Arrhythmias, Supraventricular Arrhythmias, etc, so you can really fine-tune your skills in a particular area.
100 ECfF doesn’t offer any tutorials, so obviously it’s recommended that you have some knowledge from other sources before you have a go at it, but it’s made for USMLE finals, so it’s a handy thing to have as you progress.

It isn’t available on iOS, but ACLS Rhythm Quiz is the best option over on the App Store, costing £0.79

Screenshot_2015-10-05-20-42-30~24.) QxMD ECG Guide (QxMD)
Google Play: £3.19
App Store:     £0.79

Much the same as ECGsource, but seemingly optimised for iDevices, this app has everything a PTP student could need for ECG analysis and arrhythmia recognition. This great app also comes with a handy analysis tool that can you can use to check your answers when you’re practicing.

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5.) Read by QxMD (QxMD)

Google Play: Free

App Store:    Free

This app is a wonderful way to tailor your journal reading experience to suit your course needs. New updates and articles are available frequently and are all viewable and searchable within the app. I have personally found this tool to be invaluable when trying to further understand the nuances of pathologies within cardiac science.

Hopefully these will help you along your programme as much as they have me.

Thanks!

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Have You Ever Tested A Robot?

I haven’t. That part comes in a few weeks.

I have, however, BEEN the robot in question, as today, I provided the voice and cardiac controls in my university’s simulation suite.
My peers performed ECGs on a rather frightening, dead-eyed humanoid that was, unbeknownst to them and in ME
conjunction with my voice, being used as a conduit for a scenario pertinent to our learning. That’s me on the right, there, next to my control station (a closer view makes up the header for this post) which allowed me to alter heart rate, breathing rate, create a whole host of arrhythmias and not only see my colleagues, but speak to and hear them as well.

I was a patient named Christopher Smith who had been admitted to A&E. That was all the information that had been supplied, barring my NHS number and date of birth. It was the job of my fellow students to check three patient identifiers, get a brief idea of what was wrong with me and to perform an ECG accordingly, with a brief assessment of the adjustments needed and that of the trace itself.

It was made clear both before and after the session, that it was ok to make mistakes and that this was predominantly what the session was for. It’s extremely unnerving, having a conversation with an expressionless robot that can visibly and audibly breathe, so it was nice to be reassured that the pressure wasn’t as high as it could have been.

Everything going to plan, it would emerge that my chest pain was a result of atrial fibrillation and a heart rate of a mere 32-35bpm. It was also an assessment of how quickly we prioritised the test itself. Due to the presenting chest pains, attaching the limb leads first, so as to gain a visible rhythm strip before a full 12-lead was the correct response, then adjusting the paper speed on the trace itself so as to provide an useable ECG was the next desired step. All the while, I was talking to the student practitioner, asking questions about the test and about the situation in order to see how they reacted and whether they felt comfortable keeping me, as a patient, calm at the same time as carrying out the test with the required level of haste.

These sessions were filmed and then followed a group feedback discussion. The group seemed pleased with the outcome, overall. The comments made were mostly of a positive nature, and the few criticisms there were from myself, my peers and our lecturer, were minor and constructive. This has most certainly been my most enjoyable session to date, and one I did not mind getting up at 4:30am to help set up, so needless to say, I’m very much looking forward to the next one.

I will add that the first half of the session used me as a living mannequin. The reasons that I didn’t comment on this until now are twofold;

  1. It was effectively the same as what I have written about, only without the technology
  2. Seeing my naked torso on film reminded me that I’m still carrying holiday weight. This wouldn’t be a problem, were it not the weight from four holidays.

Thanks!

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